Skip to main content
main-content
Top

06-15-2018 | Diet | Article

Association between dietary protein intake and type 2 diabetes varies by dietary pattern

Journal:
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome

Authors: Qiuyi Ke, Chaogang Chen, Fengyi He, Yongxin Ye, Xinxiu Bai, Li Cai, Min Xia

Publisher: BioMed Central

Abstract

Background

Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that high total protein intake was related to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) risks. However, few studies considered the impact of dietary pattern.

Objective

We examined the associations between protein intake and T2DM in different dietary patterns.

Methods

We used the demographic and dietary information of adults aged 18–75 years from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (2009), consisting of 4113 women and 4580 men. Dietary data was collected by using 24-h recalls combined with a food inventory for 3 consecutive days. Cluster analysis was used to classify subjects into groups, as determined by major sources of protein. Logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of T2DM according to the energy-adjusted protein intake.

Results

All participants were divided into three patterns according to the dietary source of protein (legumes and seafood, red meat, refined grains). Overall, plant protein intake was significantly and inversely associated with T2DM. In the subgroup analysis by dietary patterns, extreme quartile of plant protein intake was also inversely related to T2DM in the “legumes and seafood” group [OR = 0.58, 95% CI (0.33–0.96)]. Total protein intake and animal protein intake were positively related to T2DM in the “red meat” group [OR: 3.12 (1.65–5.91) and 3.48 (1.87–6.60), respectively]. However, the association of animal protein intake was reversed in the “refined grains” group [OR = 0.55, 95% CI 0.32–0.89].

Conclusions

The association between protein intake and T2DM varies by dietary pattern. Dietary pattern may be considered into the recommendation of protein intake for diabetes prevention.

Please log in to get access to this content

Related topics